Minggu, 25 Maret 2012

Art Knowledge News - Keeping You in Touch with the World of Art...

Art Knowledge News - Keeping You in Touch with the World of Art...


The Portland Art Museum features a Mark Rothko Retrospective

Posted: 24 Mar 2012 09:17 PM PDT

artwork: Mark Rothko - "Iphegenia and the Sea/Horizontal Phantasy", 1943 - Oil on canvas. - © 1998 Kate Rothko Prizel and Christopher Rothko. On view at the Portland Art Museum in "Mark Rothko" until May 27th.

Portland, Oregon.- The Portland Art Museum is proud to present "Mark Rothko" on view at the museum until May 27th. Regarded as one of the leading American artists of the 20th century, Mark Rothko (1903-1970) began his life in art as Marcus Rothkowitz in Portland, Oregon. Having emigrated from Russia as a 10-year-old with his mother and older sister in 1913 to join his father and brothers in Portland, Rothko attended Lincoln High School and took his first art classes at the Museum Art School before going off to Yale, New York City, and beyond. This exhibition celebrates a native son whose lyrical paintings created a legacy for the world. The Portland Art Museum was the host of Rothko's first museum exhibition in 1933 and is pleased to present this original survey of Rothko's work, the first Rothko painting retrospective to be staged in Portland.


The 45 works in the exhibition trace Rothko's artistic path from the late 1920s until shortly before his death in 1970. Borrowed from the Rothko family, the National Gallery of Art, and private collectors, the exhibition presents Portland's first comprehensive look at the artist's development and the aesthetic issues that shaped his production over the course of his career. "The exhibition is organized so that the visitor walks with Rothko as he evolves as an artist," explained Chief Curator Bruce Guenther, the curator of the exhibition. "Most people are familiar with where he ended up with the classic color field paintings. This exhibition allows people to see the development that led to that work." The exhibition moves from his early figurative works influenced by Paul Cezanne, Max Weber, and Milton Avery into the attenuated, isolated figures of his New York subway paintings, through an abstract surrealist phase to the emergence at the end of the 1940s of his mature abstract style of floating, saturated color and transcendent calm. The exhibition celebrates an artist whose lyrical paintings have created a unique legacy for the world.

artwork: Mark Rothko - "Entrance to Subway", 1938 - Oil on canvas - 86.4 x 117.5 cm - Collection of Christopher Rothko. © 1998 Kate Rothko Prizel and Christopher Rothko. - On view at the Portland Art Museum in "Mark Rothko" until May 27th.

Founded in late 1892, the Portland Art Museum is the seventh oldest museum in the United States and the oldest in the Pacific Northwest. The Museum is internationally recognized for its permanent collection and ambitious special exhibitions, drawn from the Museum's holdings and the world's finest public and private collections. The Museum's collection of more than 42,000 objects, displayed in 112,000 square feet of galleries, reflects the history of art from ancient times to today. The collection is distinguished for its holdings of arts of the native peoples of North America, English silver, and the graphic arts. An active collecting institution, the Museum devotes 90 percent of its galleries to the permanent collection. Since its founding in 1892, the Museum has amassed a significant collection of American paintings and sculptures. Located on the second level of the Belluschi Building, the collection has grown primarily through gifts and key purchases of works by artists of national acclaim. Arranged chronologically, the American art collection provides an overview of the history of American art. Early portraits by Gilbert Stuart and Erastus Salisbury Field join acknowledged late 19th–century masterworks such as the magnificent Mount Hood by Albert Bierstadt, The Sculptor and the King by George de Forest Brush, and Thomas Moran's The Grand Canal, Venice. The collection also features paintings by the great 19th–century landscape painter, George Inness.

The collection is rich in works by American Impressionists Childe Hassam and J. Alden Weir, including paintings created during their visits to Portland in the early 1900s and Weir's portrait of Museum founder C.E.S. Wood. Other works from the first half of the 20th century include paintings by artists ranging from Modernists Milton Avery and Marsden Hartley to John Sloan, George Lucks, and other members of the Eight, a group of American artists that united to oppose academism. From its earliest days, the Museum has closely followed and supported contemporary art. In 1908, the Museum acquired its first original painting, created by the American Impressionist Childe Hassam in the same year. In 1905 and 1913, exhibitions of avant-garde art were presented at the Museum, including Marcel Duchamp's Nude Descending a Staircase and other momentous works from the controversial 1913 Armory Show in New York.  The Museum began building a collection of 20th-century art in the late 1940s. A 1971 gift of funds in Evan H. Roberts' name allowed a series of sculpture purchases by artists such as Henry Moore and Mark Di Suvero. In 2000, the Museum acquired the Clement Greenberg Collection of 159 paintings, prints, drawings, and sculptures by some of the most important American artists of the mid-20th century. The acquisition, supported by Tom and Gretchen Holce, and Carol and John Hampton, along with a number of major gifts, resulted in a quantum leap in the collection. Today, the collection includes works that date back to World War I and originate from North and South America, Asia, and Europe.

artwork: Mark Rothko - "Self-portrait", 1936 - Oil on canvas - 81.9 x 65.4 cm Collection of Christopher Rothko © 1998 Kate Rothko Prizel and Christopher Rothko. On view at the Portland Art Museum.

The Belluschi Building's Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Sculpture Court is dedicated to exhibiting large-scale works from the Museum's holdings. In 2005, the Museum introduced the Jubitz Center for Modern and Contemporary Art to accommodate the growing collection. Located on all six floors of the Mark Building, the 28,000-square-foot Center was created to present rotating exhibitions of more than 400 modern works from the collection, in addition to special contemporary art exhibitions. Established early in the Museum's history, the photography holdings then consisted of only a few works. With the addition of a permanent curator of photography in the early 1980s, the collection began to rapidly expand. Today, there are approximately 5,000 works in the collection, which is part of the Vivian and Gordon Gilkey Center for Graphic Arts. The majority of images were acquired as gifts, so in a very real sense the collection is a product of the Museum's community. These images reflect the varied photographic interests of hundreds of individuals whose efforts and gifts have helped shape the collection. One of the earliest acquisitions was a complete 20–volume set of Edward Sheriff Curtis's masterwork, The North American Indian. In 1942, the Works Progress Administration of the Federal Art Projects placed a large collection of Minor White's photographs of Portland on permanent loan. Over the past 20 years, the Museum has also accepted gifts from various donors of more than 50 postwar photographs by White. The Museum has placed particular emphasis on the acquisition of images that chronicle photography in Oregon and the West, adding to work by Group f/64 organizers Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, and Imogen Cunningham, and tracing a decade-by–decade profile of photographic accomplishments by both acknowledged masters and the under–recognized. Of particular note are in–depth holdings of work by Myra Wiggins, Lily White, and Sarah Ladd, associate members of Alfred Stieglitz's Photo–Secession Movement, who lived and worked in Salem and Portland at the turn of the 20th century, as well as a rich selection of images reflecting the life work of Al Monner and Todd Walker. The collection also includes works by noted contemporary photographers, including Cindy Sherman, Lorna Simpson, and Carrie Mae Weems, Robert Adams, Elliot Erwitt, Dianne Kornberg, and Joel Sternfeld. The museum also hosts major collections of Asian and Native American art as well as a collection of more than 100 pieces of silver, ranging from a 15th-century drinking bowl to a spectacular Rococo cup and cover with maker's marks of Lewis Herne and Francis Butty. Visit the museum's website at ... http://www.portlandartmuseum.org

Art Sensus in London celebrates the Life and Work of Eve Arnold

Posted: 24 Mar 2012 09:16 PM PDT

artwork: Eve Arnold - "Horse Training for the Militia, Inner Mongolia, China", 1979 - R-type print - 17 x 14 cm. - © Eve Arnold / Magnum Photos. On view at Art Sensus, London in "All About Eve" until April 27th.

London.- Art Sensus is proud to present "All About Eve: The Photography of Eve Arnold", on view at the gallery through April 27th. In celebration of her life and work as a pioneering photographer, Art Sensus will present over 100 unique photographs and a new book  of the work of American photographer Eve Arnold (1912-2012).  The book "All About Eve" will be launched at Art Sensus on 22 March in conjunction with the exhibition. Published as a limited edition hardback book with a silk cover, "All About Eve" contains 170 of Arnold's photographs. Curated by Brigitte Lardinois (editor of 'Eve Arnold's People' and  worked on Arnold's former 'In Retrospect' exhibition at the Barbican Art Gallery),  All About Eve will offer a spectrum of incredible works, both vintage and modern, all drawn from Arnold's personal archive. The only solo exhibition to feature Arnold's work in the UK this year thus far All About Eve has been selected from a private collection, which also loaned some of the prints for the book.


The Hamburger Kunsthalle Celebrates Louise Bourgois' 100th Birthday

Posted: 24 Mar 2012 07:19 PM PDT

artwork: Louise Bourgeois - "Untitled", 2005 - Fabric - 23.8 x 27.9 cm. - Private Collection - Courtesy Hauser & Wirth and Cheim & Read © Louise Bourgeois Trust, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2011. -  At the Hamburger Kunsthalle in "Passage Dangereux" until June 17th.

Hamburg, Germany.- The Hamburger Kunsthalle is proud to present "Louise Bourgeois: Passage Dangereux", on view at the museum until June 17th. The Hamburger Kunsthalle will be honoring an artist of the century with this exhibition on the occasion of her 100th birthday. The Hamburger Kunsthalle will be showing sculptures, installations, etchings, tapestries and works made of fabric from the last 15 years of her life. The work of one of the most important and influential artists of our age manifests a very exceptional formal and material language. It deals with existential subject matter and at the same time very personal experiences that Bourgeois tirelessly pursued throughout her life and practice: fear, dependency, memory, sexuality, love and death. The works on view are on loan from renowned international museums, private collections and the Louise Bourgeois Trust. Several of the works are being exhibited for the first time ever. For more than four months, the famous "Maman" (1999) – a 9 meters high, oversized spider in bronze, steel and marble – will stand outside of the Hamburger Kunsthalle as a highly visible ambassador to the exhibition. As fearsome as it is impressive, this monumental sculpture is one of Louise Bourgeois' key works.


Othman Moussa's solo exhibition 'The Throne' opens at Ayyam Gallery in Dubai

Posted: 24 Mar 2012 07:12 PM PDT

artwork: Othman Moussa -  'King of the World', 2011 - Oil on canvas, 150 x 180 cm. - Courtesy of Ayyam Gallery, Dubai

DUBAI.- Ayyam Gallery, Dubai announcesthe opening of Othman Moussa's first solo exhibition 'The Throne'. Upholding his superb draughtsmanship and influences of seventeenth-century Dutch realism, Moussa's new works veer away from traditional still life painting of inanimate objects within Syrian life that quietly and poetically speak to the viewer, to a form of still life that shouts. Beautifully rendered, an oriental carpet covers a heavily draped armchair. It is the objects that occupy this throne, which present a satirical, subdued political commentary. On exhibition through 26th of April.

Project 4 Shows "Paul Myoda ~ Glittering Machines"

Posted: 24 Mar 2012 07:11 PM PDT

artwork: Paul Myoda - "Borderline Personality Disorder 2", 2011 - Acrylic, aluminum, LEDs, stepper motor, ultrasonic sensor, microprocessor 28" x 28" x 24" - Courtesy Project 4, Washington DC. On view in "Glittering Machines" until April 28th.

Washinton, DC.- Project 4 is proud to present "Glittering Machines," a solo exhibition of sculpture by Providence-based artist Paul Myoda. This is Myoda's first exhibition at Project 4. Glittering Machines are modular, kinetic, interactive, sonic and illuminating sculptures investigating the human relationship with the digital world. Refuting the restrictions and disembodiment of the interfaces on our everyday electronic devices, Myoda explores ways in which computers can break from the limitations of the screen and interact with the physicality of the human body. By emulating natural behaviors, these works blur the distinction between the animate and inanimate realms. "Glittering Machines" is on view at the gallery through April 28th.


Institute of Contemporary Art Boston presents Museum Survey of Charline von Heyl

Posted: 24 Mar 2012 06:26 PM PDT

artwork: Charline von Heyl - "Lazybone Shuffle", 2010 - Acrylic on linen, 82 x 76 inches. -  Courtesy of the artist, Friedrich Petzel Gallery, NY and Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne.

BOSTON, MA.- The Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston opened the first U.S. museum survey of Charline von Heyl, a compelling and important artist whose work offers new ideas and possibilities for painting, and demonstrates the medium's continued relevance in contemporary art. Von Heyl's canvases are not abstractions of objects or figures; instead, she is interested in inventing a new image that has not yet been seen and that "stands for itself as a fact." With their intentional confusion of foreground and background, their dynamic energy, and their contradictions and reversals, these paintings require (and desire) careful looking, but refuse to yield to the impulse to name, identify, or define. Organized by ICA Senior Curator Jenelle Porter, Charline von Heyl includes 12 paintings and two sets of collage-based works on paper tracing the development of von Heyl's work over the past five years. The exhibition is on view at the ICA from March 21st through July 15th.


DC Moore Gallery exhibition as the Exclusive Representative of Robert De Niro, Sr. estate

Posted: 24 Mar 2012 05:53 PM PDT

artwork: Robert De Niro, Sr. (1922-1993) - "Nude Still Life", 1969  -  Oil on fiberboard, 21 3/4 x 29 3/4 inches Courtesy of DC Moore Gallery, NY

NEW YORK, NY.- One of the most original painters of the post-war generation in New York, Robert De Niro, Sr. (1922-1993) blended abstraction and representation, bridging the gap between European modernism and Abstract Expressionism. For their first exhibition as the exclusive representatives of the Estate of Robert De Niro, Sr., DC Moore Gallery is presenting figure paintings, landscapes, still lifes, and charcoal drawings from 1960-1993. DC Moore Gallery is the exclusive representative of the Estate of Robert De Niro Sr. On exhibition through 28th April.

William S. Burroughs' artistic output on view in Germany at ZKM

Posted: 24 Mar 2012 05:32 PM PDT

artwork: Christiaan Tonnis - "William S. Burroughs" / Video / Laserprint / 2006

KARLSRUHE.- Such works as "Naked Lunch" or "The Soft Machine" are what made William S. Burroughs (1914-1997) world famous as an author. Far less known, by contrast, is that Burroughs, as a cross-media artist, also produced a comprehensive, varied body of work that no less experiments with audio tape, film and photography as it does with painting and collages. The comprehensive exhibition "the name is BURROUGHS – expanded media" presents the author's artistic output in Germany for the first time; it examines the multiple affiliations between literary and experimental image production, further augmenting the image by way of the representation of "collaborations" Burroughs produced in association with other artists. The exhibition gains additional appeal thanks to a series of works by contemporary international artists who each make unambiguous reference to Burrough's writings and his method of "expanded media", and thus, from a present-day perspective, sound out the individual pictorial potential. William S. Burroughs ... Hero, madman, alien. Grandfather to Punk, Beat Poetry, and all things weird. On view 24th march until 12th August at the ZMK .


The exhibition's goal is to make tangible, in review and for the first time within Europe on such a scale, the visionary volatility of William S. Burroughs' literary output while at the same time showing the impact of his ideas and philosophy on a wider network of authors, musicians, composers, painters, photographers, video artists and filmmakers. Now, at the beginning of the 21st century, Burroughs is more than ever considered – especially owing to the experiments he carried out in the 1960s together with painter, author, inventor Brion Gysin, with mathematician Ian Sommerville and filmmaker Antony Balch – as a pioneer of media art. In this respect, with the exhibition "the name is BURROUGHS – expanded media", the ZKM also reflects the institution's unique mandate and its own history – that it was, indeed, Burroughs, who was awarded the first Siemens Media Prize in Karlsruhe, in 1993.

Though not necessarily in chronological order, the exhibition takes up young Burroughs' dreamy idea and accompanies the protagonist from his childhood and youth in St. Louis and Los Alamos; via Harvard, trips to Europe and 1940s New York, even as far as Mexico, where he wrote his first novel Junky. Lengthy stays in Tangier, Paris, and London were interspersed with periods back in New York again; locations, in which Burroughs photographed, produced collages, made extensive photographic, audiotape and film experiments, and, with his most important collaborator Brion Gysin, actively pressed ahead with linguistic and visual developments. Burroughs systematically extended medial possibilities already by the close of the 1950s. In hindsight, his work introduced the term "expanded media" almost lexically.

artwork: George Condo - "Self portrait" - Condo and Burroughs collaborated on numerous paintings and sculptures between 1988-96. © 2001 Artists Rights Society (ARS)

In the mid-forties Burroughs came into contact with highly addictive narcotics – morphine, heroin and other opiates. On September 6, 1951, in a state of complete intoxication, Burroughs shot his wife, Joan Vollmer in Mexico City. In the estimation of the authorities, the deadly shot was an accident. "I am forced to the appalling conclusion that I would never have become a writer but for Joan's death, and to a realization of the extent to which this event has motivated and formulated my writing. I live with the constant threat of possession, and a constant need to escape from possession, from Control. So the death of Joan brought me in contact with the invader, the Ugly Spirit, and maneuvered me into a lifelong struggle, in which I have had no choice except to write my way out," wrote Burroughs in 1985, in the preface to his novel Queer (published 1951-53), in which he transgresses social taboos and declares this as his method. Throughout the sixties he was the icon of the "Beat Generation", and in the seventies the "godfather" of punk. With his epic poem HOWL (1956), Allen Ginsberg created a monument to his generation. The first line runs: "I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked…" It was with Jack Kerouac's breathless prose in On the Road that the trio Ginsberg, Kerouac and Burroughs (as Old Bull Lee) were to enter the stage of world literature. With Naked Lunch, Burroughs composed the third of those canonical works of Beat literature. The novel, in which he identifies language as a virus, rose to the status of a "cult book" during the second half of the twentieth century. Censorship of the publication Naked Lunch in America in 1962 – the book was published in Paris as early as 1959 – ensured Burroughs headlines in the world press. Over the course of the ensuing lawsuit Norman Mailer did not only attest "a certain genius" to him, but the suit also culminated in the abolition of literary censorship in the USA.

artwork: Movie Poster for the "Bade Runner" based on a novel by William S. Burroughs.After a quarter of a century of self-imposed exile, Burroughs returned to the United States permanently in spring 1974; he lived in New York for several years before spending his final years in the small university city of Lawrence, Kansas, where he, from the mid-1980s as "fine artist of the visual", increasingly began to critically examine, transgress and consequently extend the limits of the possible – also in the traditional media of panel painting and works on paper.

The exhibition "the name is Burroughs – expanded media" tracks the most influential stages and encounters in the life of William S. Burroughs, and includes some rarely accessible written, lyric, photographic, audio and film documents. Among these belong approximately 600 various editions of his books, published worldwide, which were loaned by one of the largest private collections on this theme. The paintings and drawings, documented with more than 150 original exhibits the majority of which stem from the Estate of William S. Burroughs (Lawrence, Kansas) as managed by James Grauerholz, are supplemented by additional loans from public and private collections. The exhibition impressively shows to the public that Burrough's work on "paintings and drawings" represents an original contribution to North American contemporary art.

The exhibition also displays those works – in the spirit of Burroughs' and Brion Gysin collaborative project The Third Mind – that were created in cooperation with other outstanding artists: with Robert Rauschenberg, Keith Haring, George Condo , Robert Wilson, Francesco Clemente , Philip Taaffe, John Giorno, Laurie Anderson, Kurt Cobain, Patti Smith and others.

The significance of the works, as well as William S. Burroughs' personality as countercultural icon for artists' production across a number of generations is covered by way of prominent works. The spectrum covers the work of Walter Stöhrer and Rolf-Gunter Dienst or David Wojnarowicz through to Larry Clark and Christoph Lissy. Furthermore, numerous photographic portraits of Burroughs by Gerard Malanga, Charles Gatewood, Robert Mapplethorpe, Richard Avedon and others are also on show. Among the highlights there are approximately 80 photographic prints of original negatives by Burroughs and Gysin loaned by the Barry Miles Collection, London, as well as a typewriter used by Burroughs in Paris, and the blade with which Brion Gysin discovered the literary method of CUT-UP.

During the exhibition, the ZKM, in cooperation with the Estate of William S. Burroughs, plans a comprehensive publication including numerous essays and over 300 illustrations mostly hitherto unpublished works from the artist's varied oeuvre.

As a cultural institution, the Center for Art and Media (ZKM) in Karlsruhe holds a unique position in the world. It responds to the rapid developments in information technology and today's changing social structures. Its work combines production and research, exhibitions and events, coordination and documentation. Visit ZKM at : http://on1.zkm.de/zkm/e/

The Ferrin Gallery Shows "The Pursuit of Porcelain" Installation

Posted: 24 Mar 2012 05:15 PM PDT

artwork: Kendrick Moholt/Chris Antemann - "Dining in the Altogether", 2010 - Archival print - Edition of 5 - 40" x 60".  Courtesy the Ferrin Gallery, MA. On view in "The Pursuit of Porcelain" until July 24th.

Pittsfield, MA.- The Ferrin Gallery is proud to present "The Pursuit of Porcelain" an installation of ceramic sculpture, photography and works on paper, based on a is an a European 18th century porcelain room filled with a collection of figurines, plates and objects. The installation, conceived by sculptor Chris Antemann includes her own sculpture and photography shown along with interpretations of the concept by other invited artists who share her passion for porcelain and its history. "The Pursuit of Porcelain" is on view at the gallery until July 24th.


Sergei Isupov - "Traveler" - Ceramic - 14" x 7" x 5.5" - 2011 Courtesy the Ferrin Gallery.Amongst the artists included in the show are Chris Antemann, Christa Assad, Barnaby Barford, Sean Capone, Lucy Feller, Gesine Hackenberg, Molly Hatch, Giselle Hicks, Sergei Isupov, Garth Johson, James Klein & David Reid, Steve Lee, Frances Palmer, Kelly Garrett Rathbone, Vipoo Srivlasa, Mara Superior, Jason Walker, Kurt Weiser, Gerit Grimm, Red Weldon Sandlin, Bill Wright, and Gwendolyn Yoppolo. Bill Wright, Portrait Photographer captured the group of artists assembled in NYC for the opening of Pursuit of Porcelain in group and individual portraits. A show of these photographs is included in the exhibtion.

Chris Antemann is one of seven artists designated by Bonnie Laing-Malcolmson to receive the Portland Art Museum's Northwest Art Awards in June. Of the seven, one person will be awarded the $10,000 Arlene Schnitzer Prize, named after the former art dealer and local patron who funded the museum's Northwest art program. Antemann has been chosen for 'MEISSEN artCAMPUS' Experiencing Porcelain, a program initiated in 2010 by MEISSEN Porcelain Manufactory' as the company looks back over three centuries of fine porcelain art, jewellery and architecture in fine porcelain. Meissen's CEO, Christian Kurtzke adds, "Meissen has always been committed to nurturing and promoting both up and coming and established international artists. We look forward to welcoming Antemann whose work perfectly captures the traditional style and craftsmanship of the brand yet in a characteristically contemporary and witty way."

Antemann, 41 years old, earned her M.F.A. in ceramics from the University of Minnesota and her B.F.A. in ceramics & painting from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She has exhibited extensively in the United States and China. Her work can be found in many private and public collections, including the Museum of Arts and Design, The 21 C. Hotel Museum, The KAMM Teapot Foundation, The Archie Bray Foundation, and the Foshan Ceramic Museum in China. Her artist residencies include The Archie Bray Foundation and The John Michael Kohler Arts Center, where she was the NEA funded resident. Most recently, she is the 2010 First Place Winner of the Virginia A. Groot Grant, a prestigious grant awarded to artists working in 3D to allow them time to further their work.

artwork: Chris Antemann - "Sideboard", 2011 - Ceramic - 14" x 16" x 7". Courtesy the Ferrin Gallery On view in "The Pursuit of Porcelain" until July 24th.

Ferrin Gallery, established in 1979, is one of the nation's premier ceramic art and sculpture galleries. The gallery program presents changing exhibitions featuring contemporary art, photography and sculpture from throughout the region along with nationally known ceramic sculptors and studio potters. The gallery is located in downtown Pittsfield in the heart of the Berkshires of Western Massachusetts, an area known for its cultural offerings. Ferrin Gallery, was located in Northampton, MA, a college town in Western Massachusetts, for over twenty years. It shared its location with Pinch Pottery, a shop that featured functional ceramics and affordable handmade objects. Established in 1979, Pinch Pottery began as a studio and showroom with founding partners, Leslie Ferrin, Mara Superior and Barbara Walch. In 1987 Ferrin Gallery was established when the business moved to Main Street. Donald Clark joined the team in 1990. In Northampton, Ferrin Gallery showed work in ceramics from local and regional artists, periodic theme shows of work in all media and specialized in contemporary teapots. In July, 1999, the combination shop and gallery formally separated, with the Ferrin Gallery relocation to Lenox, MA. Renovation of the space in Northampton took place and the shop reopened with a new name, P!NCH. In February of 2006, P!NCH was sold to Jena Sujat. In 2004, Ferrin Gallery took over the space occupied in Lenox, MA by the Ute Stebich Gallery and began showing painting, photography and mixed media sculpture and continued the tradition of both solo and thematic group shows. In June 2007, the gallery opened a 2600 sq ft space in downtown Pittsfield. and closed the Lenox location in the fall of 2007. During the "off season" the gallery participates in national art fairs in Miami, Palm Beach, Chicago and New York. Visit the gallery's website at ... www.FerrinGallery.com

UK's Longest Running Photography Festival Celebrates 20 Years

Posted: 24 Mar 2012 05:14 PM PDT

artwork: Simon Norfolk retrospective on display in Hereford Museum and Art Gallery and will be curated by photographer Paul Seawright.

HEREFORDSHIRE.- 2010 marks the 20th anniversary of Hereford Photography Festival. The longest running annual photography festival in the UK, Hereford Photography Festival has presented a broad range of international photography since 1990. This year, the Festival builds on its strong history of showing work by groundbreaking and leading photographers such as Martin Parr, Rankin and Wang Qingsong, with a major retrospective, new commissions, a series of exhibitions and more. Starting on Friday 29th October with a launch weekend of exhibitions, talks, workshops and a conference, this year's festival will be bigger than ever and encompass the city and local area. Entry to all exhibitions is free.

Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art Presents Jeff Koons ~ "Artist Rooms"

Posted: 24 Mar 2012 05:13 PM PDT

artwork: Jeff Koons - "Caterpillar" (with chains), 2003 - Polychromed aluminum and rubber coated steel: 45.70 x 195.60 x 106.70 cm. Acquired jointly through The d'Offay Donation with assistance from the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the Art Fund 2008 © Jeff Koons.


EDINBURGH.- One of the most highly acclaimed and internationally successful artists working today is the focus of a new display at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art this spring. ARTIST ROOMS: Jeff Koons brings together a selection of 18 major works charting the American artist's career from the early 1980s until 2003. The works on display will be taken from ARTIST ROOMS, a collection of modern and contemporary art held by Tate and National Galleries of Scotland for the nation. Following the successes of 2009 and 2010, 21 museums and galleries across the UK (including 17 venues outside of London and Edinburgh) in 2011 will be showing ARTIST ROOMS exhibitions and displays from the collection assembled by the art collector and curator, Anthony d'Offay. ARTIST ROOMS is owned jointly by the Tate and National Galleries of Scotland. On Tour with the Art Fund has been devised to enable this collection to reach and inspire new audiences across the country, particularly young people.


The Weatherspoon Art Museum Shows "Altered States" From Its Collection

Posted: 24 Mar 2012 05:12 PM PDT

artwork: Minnie "Midway to Madness",   1962 - Graphite, ink, and wax crayon on paper - 11 3/4" x 8 7/8" Collection of the Weatherspoon Art Museum at the University of North Carolina on view in "Altered States" until February 12th.

Greensboro, North Carolina.- The Weatherspoon Art Museum at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro is pleased to present "Altered States" on view at the museum through February 12th. The term "altered states" (of mind, of consciousness, of awareness, etc.) describes intense mental and/or psychological changes that cause the person to lose his/her normal sensory perceptions. Almost always temporary, these distortions can occur as a result of fever, psychosis, meditation, lucid dreaming, sensory deprivation or overload, and trauma, to name but a few stimulants. Frequently associated with being transported into a transcendent realm of higher consciousness or truth, the phenomenon often is associated with artistic creativity as well. The works of art on display in this exhibition not only feature figures experiencing such mind expansions and visions, but also depict the products of such mental conditions. The exhibition is based around works from the museum's collection.

The Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute shows 'The Art of the Pastel'

Posted: 24 Mar 2012 05:11 PM PDT

artwork: Edgar Degas - The Entrance of the Masked Dancers, 1879 -  Pastel on paper, 19 1/4 x 25 1/2 in. Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts

WILLIAMSTOWN, MA -  Pastel has long been embraced as an exceptionally versatile and effective drawing technique. The Art of the Pastel at the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute will feature eleven works by Edgar Degas, Jean-François Millet, Camille Pissarro, Mary Cassatt, and others. The pastels will be on view November 22, 2008, through February 16, 2009.

artwork: Jean-François Millet - The Sower, c. 1865-66 / Black conté crayon & pastel on paper, 18 1/2 x 14 3/4 in. Sterling & Francine Clark Art InstituteThe Art of the Pastel  highlights the range of styles and subjects explored by nineteenth-century artists using this delicate yet spirited technique. Included are Méry Laurent Wearing a Small Toque by Édouard Manet; Entrance of the Masked Dancers by Edgar Degas; Boulevard de Clichy, Effect of Winter Sunlight by Camille Pissarro; Portrait of Mrs. Cyrus J. Lawrence with Grandson R. Lawrence Oakley, Simone in a White Bonnet, and Child in a Red Hat by Mary Cassatt; Little Girl with a Pear by Frederick Childe Hassam; Madame Maugey-Rosengart and a Dog in an Interior by Edouard Vuillard; The Sower by Jean-François Millet; and Portrait of William W. Gilbert and Portrait of Catherine Casine Gilbert attributed to James Sharples.

A favored medium for portraiture since the eighteenth century, the pastel crayon—composed of vibrant pigments and gum-based binders—produces colored lines with fluidity and flexibility, allowing artists to create quickly conceived, luminous designs which can then be manipulated through layering, smudging, and blending. The resultant image, while similar in effect to a finished oil painting, can be extremely fragile due to the powdery nature of the medium.

The Clark's outstanding collection of pastels has been an important feature since the museum's founding. From Sterling and Francine Clark's purchase of Entrance of the Masked Dancers in 1927, to the addition of Pissarro's Boulevard de Clichy in 1996, the collection has expanded to include key works by prominent artists in the medium, exploring the art of the pastel as it was practiced throughout the nineteenth century. The Clark has more than 5,000 prints, drawings, and photographs, which are available for viewing in the print study room by advance appointment. To schedule an appointment, call (413) 458-0560 or email print@clarkart.edu

artwork: Camille Pissarro - Boulevard de Clichy, Effect of Winter Sunlight, 1880 Pastel on blue paper, 23 5/8 x 29 1/8 in. Sterling and Francine Clark Art InstituteAbout the Clark

In 1950 Sterling and Francine Clark chartered the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute as a home for their extensive art collection. Opened to public in 1955, the Institute has built upon this extraordinary group of works to become one of the most beloved and respected art museums in the world, known for its intimate galleries and stunning natural environment. One of the few institutions in the United States that combines a public art museum with a complement of research and academic programs, including a major art history library, the Clark is now a leading international center for research and discussion on the nature of art and art history. Building upon the founders' legacy, the Institute has recently unveiled its master plan for the twenty-first century, which fosters the Clark's commitment to providing space for its expanding research and museum programs while maintaining the unique character of its beautiful rural setting.

The Clark is located at 225 South Street in Williamstown, Massachusetts. The galleries are open Tuesday through Sunday, 10 am to 5 pm (daily in July and August). Admission is free November through May. Admission June 1 through October 31 is $12.50 for adults, free for children 18 and younger, members, and students with valid ID. For more information, call 413-458-2303 or visit www.clarkart.edu .

Picasso and the Masters opens at the Galeries Nationales du Grand Palais

Posted: 24 Mar 2012 05:10 PM PDT

artwork: 'Woman in an Armchair,' by Pablo Picasso - Oil on canvas, 51 3/8 by 38 1/4 in. The Solinger Collection, 1927, left; 'Decorative Figure on an Ornamental Background,' by Henri Matisse, oil on canvas, 51 1/8 by 38 3/8 in. Centre Georges Pompidou, right 

PARIS - Pablo Picasso was trained in the strict rules of academic painting at a very early age, first by his father, José Ruiz-Blasco, a teacher at the fine art school in Málaga and director of the Malaga Museum, and then as a student (1893-1899) at the fine arts school of La Corùna, at La Lonja (Barcelona).  Drawings from the antique, statuary and architectonics, copies of paintings by the great Spanish masters formed the core of this training, rooted in the humanist pictorial tradition which reminds us that Picasso was born in the 19th century (1881).

Miami Art Museum exhibits New Acquisitions from the Permanent Collection

Posted: 24 Mar 2012 05:09 PM PDT

artwork: Emilio Perez - In the middle of something, 2007 - Acrylic and latex on wood panel, 72 x 66 inches. Collection Miami Art Museum, museum purchase with funds from the MAM Collectors Council

MIAMI, FL - A reinstallation showcasing both "old favorites" and new acquisitions from the permanent collection of Miami Art Museum opens to the public Friday. "These new acquisitions, which are a combination of gifts and purchases by MAM's Collector's Council, strengthen MAM's holdings of 20th and 21st century art. " MAM's Assistant Director for Programs/Senior Curator Peter Boswell said. "The collection increasingly reflects the diversity of Miami's audience, as well as our vision for the future of MAM." The reinstallation will be on view in MAM's Plaza-level gallery through November 2, 2008.

The Portland Art Museum Displays Three Centuries of Japanese Prints

Posted: 24 Mar 2012 05:08 PM PDT

artwork: Utagawa Toyoharu - "Ukie nô kyôgen no zu (Perspective Picture of a Noh Performance)", circa 1770 - Color woodblock print - 9 13/16" x 14 15/16" Collection of the Portland Art Museum, Oregon. On view in "The Artist's Touch, The Craftsman's Hand: Three Centuries of Japanese Prints from the Portland Art Museum" until January 22nd 2012.

Portland, Oregon.-  The Portland Art Museum is proud to present "The Artist's Touch, The Craftsman's Hand: Three Centuries of Japanese Prints from the Portland Art Museum" on view through January 22nd 2012. The Portland Art Museum owns an extensive collection of over 2,500 Japanese prints dating from the late 17th century to the present. This fall through January, the museum will mount its first major exhibition of prints selected from the permanent collection. Some of the more historically important pieces in the exhibit were chosen from the Mary Andrews Ladd collection of 750 traditional woodblock prints which was gifted to the museum in 1932. The exhibit will also feature rare prints by iconic Ukiyo-e artists like Suzuki Harunobu, credited as the first to produce full-colour prints, and Katsushika Hokusai, known for his series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji. Other rare works include privately commissioned surimono prints that were used for special occasions. Quintessential images of Japanese beauties (bijin-ga) and 18th-century prints of actors are stellar examples from the collection.


Works from the 20th century include a series of emotional landscapes and devastated cityscapes showing the tragic aftermath of the Great Kanto- Earthquake of 1923. Examples of artistic styles from the Post-War period are reflected in prints like Kunihiro Amano's 1975 Op Art piece Lost Past #4. Japanese prints have been integral to the identity of the Portland Art Museum since 1932 when the Museum was given more than 750 traditional woodblock prints from the collection of Mary Andrews Ladd. Since then, the Museum's collection has grown to more than 2,500 works and spans from the late 17th century to the present day. This fall, after three years of intensive research, the Museum will present the first major exhibition to draw exclusively from this remarkable public resource.

artwork: Utagawa Toyohiro - "Parlor Puppets: Act VI of The Treasury of Loyal Retainers" circa 1803 -  Woodblock print -  Collection of the Portland Art Museum, Oregon.

The Artist's Touch, The Craftsman's Hand will feature a finely honed selection of some 250 of the most historically important and visually compelling Japanese prints in the collection. Visitors will encounter familiar artists such as Harunobu and Hokusai - icons in the history of Japanese printmaking — and the prints will be a revelation, as nearly half of the works in the exhibition are unique or extremely rare. Special strengths in the collection include 18th-century actor prints; surimono, deluxe prints that were privately commissioned; and painterly landscapes of the early 20th century, including a series that documents the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923. The exhibition will conclude with the new developments of the Post-War period, from Op Art and Abstract Expressionism to lyrical evocations of an imagined past.

artwork: Jôkata Kaiseki - "Mount Fuji in Autumn" from an untitled series of twelve views of Mount Fuji, 1929 - Color woodblock print - 10 3/4" x 14 1/16" - Collection of the Portland Art Museum,OR.

Founded in late 1892, the Portland Art Museum is the seventh oldest museum in the United States and the oldest in the Pacific Northwest. The Museum is internationally recognized for its permanent collection and ambitious special exhibitions, drawn from the Museum's holdings and the world's finest public and private collections. The Museum's collection of more than 42,000 objects, displayed in 112,000 square feet of galleries, reflects the history of art from ancient times to today. The collection is distinguished for its holdings of arts of the native peoples of North America, English silver, and the graphic arts. An active collecting institution, the Museum devotes 90 percent of its galleries to the permanent collection. Since its founding in 1892, the Museum has amassed a significant collection of American paintings and sculptures. Located on the second level of the Belluschi Building, the collection has grown primarily through gifts and key purchases of works by artists of national acclaim. Arranged chronologically, the American art collection provides an overview of the history of American art. Early portraits by Gilbert Stuart and Erastus Salisbury Field join acknowledged late 19th–century masterworks such as the magnificent Mount Hood by Albert Bierstadt, The Sculptor and the King by George de Forest Brush, and Thomas Moran's The Grand Canal, Venice. The collection also features paintings by the great 19th–century landscape painter, George Inness.

artwork: Katsushika Hokusai - "The Falling Mist Waterfall at Mount Kurokami in Shimotsuke Province", 1833/34 - Woodblock print - Collection of the Portland Art Museum, Oregon. The collection is rich in works by American Impressionists Childe Hassam and J. Alden Weir, including paintings created during their visits to Portland in the early 1900s and Weir's portrait of Museum founder C.E.S. Wood. Other works from the first half of the 20th century include paintings by artists ranging from Modernists Milton Avery and Marsden Hartley to John Sloan, George Lucks, and other members of the Eight, a group of American artists that united to oppose academism. From its earliest days, the Museum has closely followed and supported contemporary art. In 1908, the Museum acquired its first original painting, created by the American Impressionist Childe Hassam in the same year. In 1905 and 1913, exhibitions of avant-garde art were presented at the Museum, including Marcel Duchamp's Nude Descending a Staircase and other momentous works from the controversial 1913 Armory Show in New York.  The Museum began building a collection of 20th-century art in the late 1940s. A 1971 gift of funds in Evan H. Roberts' name allowed a series of sculpture purchases by artists such as Henry Moore and Mark Di Suvero. In 2000, the Museum acquired the Clement Greenberg Collection of 159 paintings, prints, drawings, and sculptures by some of the most important American artists of the mid-20th century. The acquisition, supported by Tom and Gretchen Holce, and Carol and John Hampton, along with a number of major gifts, resulted in a quantum leap in the collection. Today, the collection includes works that date back to World War I and originate from North and South America, Asia, and Europe. The Belluschi Building's Arlene and Harold Schnitzer Sculpture Court is dedicated to exhibiting large-scale works from the Museum's holdings. In 2005, the Museum introduced the Jubitz Center for Modern and Contemporary Art to accommodate the growing collection. Located on all six floors of the Mark Building, the 28,000-square-foot Center was created to present rotating exhibitions of more than 400 modern works from the collection, in addition to special contemporary art exhibitions. Established early in the Museum's history, the photography holdings then consisted of only a few works. With the addition of a permanent curator of photography in the early 1980s, the collection began to rapidly expand. Today, there are approximately 5,000 works in the collection, which is part of the Vivian and Gordon Gilkey Center for Graphic Arts. The majority of images were acquired as gifts, so in a very real sense the collection is a product of the Museum's community. These images reflect the varied photographic interests of hundreds of individuals whose efforts and gifts have helped shape the collection. One of the earliest acquisitions was a complete 20–volume set of Edward Sheriff Curtis's masterwork, The North American Indian. In 1942, the Works Progress

Administration of the Federal Art Projects placed a large collection of Minor White's photographs of Portland on permanent loan. Over the past 20 years, the Museum has also accepted gifts from various donors of more than 50 postwar photographs by White. The Museum has placed particular emphasis on the acquisition of images that chronicle photography in Oregon and the West, adding to work by Group f/64 organizers Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, and Imogen Cunningham, and tracing a decade-by–decade profile of photographic accomplishments by both acknowledged masters and the under–recognized. Of particular note are in–depth holdings of work by Myra Wiggins, Lily White, and Sarah Ladd, associate members of Alfred Stieglitz's Photo–Secession Movement, who lived and worked in Salem and Portland at the turn of the 20th century, as well as a rich selection of images reflecting the life work of Al Monner and Todd Walker. The collection also includes works by noted contemporary photographers, including Cindy Sherman, Lorna Simpson, and Carrie Mae Weems, Robert Adams, Elliot Erwitt, Dianne Kornberg, and Joel Sternfeld. The museum also hosts major collections of Asian and Native American art as well as a collection of more than 100 pieces of silver, ranging from a 15th-century drinking bowl to a spectacular Rococo cup and cover with maker's marks of Lewis Herne and Francis Butty. Visit the museum's website at ... http://www.portlandartmuseum.org

New Photographs by Julian Faulhaber at Hasted Hunt Kraeutler

Posted: 24 Mar 2012 05:07 PM PDT

artwork: Julian Faulhaber - "V.I.N.C.I.", 2009 - Photo: Courtesy Hasted Hunt Kraeutler, NYC.

NEW YORK, NY.- Hasted Hunt Kraeutler presents an exhibition of new photographs from the body of work Lowdensitypolyethylene by Julian Faulhaber. The German-born photographer made his United States debut in Chisel curated by Kathy Ryan of the New York Times at the first annual New York Photo Festival in 2008. His first gallery show in New York followed in the fall of that year at Hasted Hunt Kraeutler. Since then, Faulhaber has been named a new and emerging photographer to watch in 2009 by Photo District News (PDN) and has been included in the exhibition Reality Check: Truth and Illusion in Contemporary Photography at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. On view 8 May through 26 June.

Pulliam Deffenbaugh Gallery shows James Boulton

Posted: 24 Mar 2012 05:06 PM PDT

artwork: James Boulton - Boolean Logic Shark, 2006 - Oil on canvas - 70 x 95? 

Portland, OR - Using the circle, triangle, and square as overarching compositional elements in this new body of work, painter James Boulton, pays a measure of homage to 19th century mathematician and philosopher, George Boole.  (Mr. Boole invented Boolean algebra, upon which digital electronics, computers and the contemporary internet search engine are built.) The artist capably synthesizes forces from the contemporary world – technology, youth culture, mass media, global events – into abstraction.  The juxtaposition of logic and chaos are a forte of the hyperkinetic artist who says, "I build paintings and drawings from discreet graphic sources and impetuous operations." The energy and visual impact in these new paintings is palpable in scale, color and gesture.
 

Vancouver Art Gallery To Host 'The Colour of My Dreams ~ The Surrealist Revolution'

Posted: 24 Mar 2012 05:05 PM PDT

artwork: André Masson - "Ophelia", 1937 - Oil on canvas. Baltimore Museum of Art. Bequest of Sadie A. May. © Estate of Andé Masson. On loan for 'The Colour of My Dreams: The Surrealist Revolution in Art' exhibition at the Vancouver Art Gallery from May 28 - September 25.

Vancouver, Canada - 'The Colour of My Dreams: The Surrealist Revolution in Art' is the most comprehensive exhibition of surrealist art ever presented in Canada. Included are outstanding works by Hans Bellmer, Louise Bourgeois, Joseph Cornell, Salvador Dalí, Max Ernst, Alberto Giacometti, René Magritte, Joan Miró, Man Ray, Dorothea Tanning, Yves Tanguy and other leading figures of Surrealism. Guest curator Dawn Ades, a renowned scholar and leading expert on the movement, has selected more than 300 works of art that underscore the radical sense of experimentation that contributed to the founding of Surrealism in the 1920s and resulted in a rich diversity of painting, sculpture, drawing, photography and film in the ensuing decades.

André Breton wrote the first Manifesto of Surrealism in 1924. With the ideas of Sigmund Freud as a major inspiration, Breton set out an approach to creativity that would free artists from what was seen as "false rationality" and tap directly into the unconscious mind and dreams. The exhibition will explore the themes of desire, androgyny, violence, transmutation and dream states that captured the imagination of Surrealist artists and were explored repeatedly over several decades. It will also highlight techniques invented by artists in the movement, including automatism, frottage, fumage and the surrealist object, an approach to sculpture in which several unrelated components, most often found objects, were joined together.On exhibit May 28 – September 25 at the Vancouver Art Gallery.

artwork: René Magritte - "The Six Elements", 1929 - Oil on canvas. Philadelphia Museum of Art © Estate of René Magritte/SODRAC (2010). On loan to Vancouver Art Gallery


artwork: Edith Rimmington - "The Oneiroscopist", 1947 Oil on canvas - 51 x 41 cm. The Vera and Arturo Schwarz Collection of Dada & Surrealist Art in the Israel Museum © Estate of the artist.In addition to providing a comprehensive overview of one of the twentieth century's most important artistic movements, the exhibition also examines (for the first time) the passionate interest in the indigenous art of the Pacific Northwest by Surrealist artists such as Breton, Enrico Donati, Robert Lebel, Wolfgang Paalen and Kurt Seligmann. The exhibition reveals the formative influence of early silent cinema, in particular American films starring performers such as Buster Keaton and Charlie Chaplin, on the development of surrealist film. This historic exhibition brings together loans from many of the world's foremost public and private collections including the Guggenheim, the Metropolitan and the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., the Musée du quai Branly and the Musée national d'art moderne/Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris and the Tate in London. This exhibition is organized by the Vancouver Art Gallery and curated by Dawn Ades.

In its 79-year history, the Vancouver Art Gallery has expanded three times. Currently operating at and beyond capacity after nearly 30 years in the renovated former provincial courthouse building, the Gallery is now planning a new, purpose-built facility that will meet the community's needs for the next 50 years and beyond. Construction of the original Vancouver Art Gallery building began in March of 1931, funded by $130,000 raised by a group of art patrons led by Vancouver businessman Henry A. Stone. In 1951, the Vancouver Art Gallery at 1145 Georgia Street was expanded to three times it original size in order to accommodate 157 works by Emily Carr, willed by the artist to the province of British Columbia before her death in 1945. The Vancouver Art Gallery remained at 1145 Georgia Street until 1983, when it moved to its present location in the former provincial courthouse building bound by Georgia, Howe, Hornby and Robson Streets. The new Vancouver Art Gallery opened to the public in October 1983 in the retrofitted courthouse building with 41,400 square feet of exhibition space. The Vancouver Art Gallery's collection originated with few Canadian works and a strong emphasis on British historical painting.

The Vancouver Art Gallery houses a number of major works by Canadian artists (in addition to the Emily Carr collection), including Lawren Harris, A.Y. Jackson, Arthur Lismer, Jock Macdonald, J.W. Morrice, David Milne, Harold Town, Gershon Iskowitz and Jack Bush. The collection includes a number of works by some of Quebec's best known artists, including Theophile Hamel, Antoine Plamondon, Marc-Aurèle de Foy Suzor-Coté, Paul-Emile Borduas, Guido Molinari, Jacques de Tonnancour, Claude Tousignant, Charles Gagnon, Yves Gaucher, Alfred Pellan and Jean-Paul Lemieux. The Gallery has acquired major works by Quebecois contemporaries such as Genviève Cadieux, Jana Sterbak, Jocelyne Alloucherie and Betty Goodwin. The Gallery's European historical collection includes Dutch paintings from the seventeenth century by Jan Anthoniszoon van Ravenstyn, Jan Wynants, Isaac van Ostade, Pieter Neeffs the Elder, Jacob Marrel, Jan van Huysum, Balthasar van der Ast, Ambrosium Bosschaert the Younger, Jan Josefsz van Goyen, Abraham Storck, Roelof de Vries, Willem van de Velde the Younger, Adriaen van der Kabel, Salomon van Ruysdael, Flemish-Cornelius de Heem, Roelandt Savery and a fine first edition of Francisco Jose de Goya y Lucientes' Disasters of War. Visit the museum's website at ... www.vanartgallery.bc.ca

This Week in Review in Art Knowledge News

Posted: 24 Mar 2012 05:04 PM PDT

This is a new feature for the subscribers and visitors to Art Knowledge News (AKN), that will enable you to see "thumbnail descriptions" of the last ninety (90) articles and art images that we published. This will allow you to visit any article that you may have missed ; or re-visit any article or image of particular interest. Every day the article "thumbnail images" will change. For you to see the entire last ninety images just click : here .

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This Week in Review in Art News

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